Growing Babies

Growing Babies

I just wanted to pop on and share one of our growing babies. If you’ve followed me on Instagram, you know that we decided to jump into the registered part of raising long horns last year and this is our very first registered baby we’ve raised. We have some big goals and plans for our growing herd and are excited to explore this part within TLBAA with our girls. This little bull calf is such a neat little dude and is already sold. He will be going to his new home in November.

Mulberry is such a great mama and I’m excited for more babies out of her. We pick up a new heifer and bull this fall and I’ll be sure to update you when we unload them on the ranch.

Texas Longhorn Education | Part 1

Texas Longhorn Education | Part 1

Mulberry……as you know, I love my Longhorns. It’s not my family’s first choice of cattle or what the Rafter PS Ranch has the majority of. My herd is small, but growing. I hope one day to have several and need another piece of land to raise them all.

I love what they embody, their hardiness, and let’s face it, they are pretty cool to look at. The inspiration behind my store branding came from my first girl, Rose.

I’ve wanted to share a little education on my blog for some time about the breed, why I like them, and what I hope to gain from starting a registered herd from the ground up. So here’s post one of many and I will tag the source of my info below.

“The Texas Longhorn became the foundation of the American cattle industry by claiming first rights in the untamed, newly discovered Americas more than 500 years ago. In 1690, the first herd of cattle was driven north from Mexico to land that would eventually become Texas. By the Civil War, millions of Longhorns ranged between the mesquite-dotted sandy banks of the Rio Bravo to the sand beds of the Sabine. Most of the Longhorns were unbranded, survivors of Indian raids, scattered by stampedes and weather, escaped from missions or abandoned after ranch failures.

Less than 40 years later, the Longhorn was closer to extinction than the buffalo. In 1927, the Federal government stepped in to help preserve the Texas Longhorn and a great part of our American heritage. Congress assigned forest service rangers, Will C. Barnes and John H. Hatton, to the task and these two men put the first herd together for Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. Gradually, more breeders started raising private stock, recognizing the value of Texas Longhorns.” – Texas Longhorn Breeders Association